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Challenging the traditional culture vulture: Experiential marketing in the cultural tourism sector

Leighton, D 2010, Challenging the traditional culture vulture: Experiential marketing in the cultural tourism sector , in: ATLAS Annual Conference: Mass tourism vs Niche tourism, November 3 - 5, 2010, Limassol, Cyprus.

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      Abstract

      This paper investigates experiential marketing as a means of promoting cultural heritage within a highly competitive leisure and tourism marketplace. It explores the role and significance of heritage tourism and the emergence of cultural heritage tourism as a niche market segment. Heritage is explored as a consumption based experience, within a UK tourism sector that has been surprisingly slow to adopt an experiential approach and that has focused instead on conventional marketing concepts and product based, transactional offerings. Indications are however that those cultural heritage attractions that have moved away from a traditional product focus toward an experiential approach have succeeded in maintaining or even increasing visitor numbers in the face of adverse market conditions. They may have located- or even created- new, niche visitor segments, or they may simply be engaging traditional visitor segments in new ways. The analytical basis for the evaluation is provided through a comparative case study analysis of two cultural heritage attractions operating in niche segments. The paper concludes by proposing a diagnostic model for practitioners taking forward experiential marketing as a timely and effective niche marketing strategy.

      Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
      Uncontrolled Keywords: experiential marketing, heritage tourism, niche marketing
      Themes: Subjects / Themes > G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General) > G0149 Travel. Voyages and travels (General) > G0149.5 Travel and state. Tourism
      Subjects outside of the University Themes
      Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences > School of Arts & Media > Centre for Media, Art & Design Research and Engagement (MADRE)
      Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences > School of Arts & Media
      Journal or Publication Title: Mass Tourism v Niche Tourism
      Publisher: ATLAS
      Refereed: Yes
      ISSN: 978-90-75775-50-1
      Depositing User: D Leighton
      Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2010 15:44
      Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 17:43
      References: Arts Council (2009) Arts Audiences: Insight. Available online at http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/media/uploads/Arts_audiences_insight.pdf Bradburne J.M (1998) Dinosaurs and White Elephants. Museum Management and Curatorship. Vol 17 pp 119-137 Bywater, M (1993) The Market for Cultural Tourism in Europe. Travel and Tourism Analyst. 6 pp30-46 Heritage Lottery Fund (2010) Investing in Success: Heritage and the UK Tourism Economy. Available online at http://www.culture24.org.uk/sector+info/art76805 Holcomb, B (1999). Marketing Cities for Tourism. In : Judd, D and Fainstein, S eds, 1999. The Tourist City. Yale University Press: New Haven. Pp54-70 Hughes, H (2000). Arts, Entertainment and Tourism.Butterworth- Heinemann : London Hughes, H and Allen, D (2005) Cultural Tourism in Central and eastern Europe: The views of ‘induced image formation agents’. Tourism Management.Volume 26. Issue 2. pp173-183 www.jorvik-viking-centre.co.uk Leighton, D (2007) Step Back in Time and Live the Legend: Experiential Marketing and the Heritage Sector. International Journal of NonProfit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. Vol 12 pp117-125 Manzenac, J.A (2001) Consumer Psychology of Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure. CABI, Wallingford, UK
      URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/12553

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