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The cult of champ man: the culture and pleasures of championship manager/football manager gamers

Crawford, G 2006, 'The cult of champ man: the culture and pleasures of championship manager/football manager gamers' , Information, Communication & Society, 9 (4) , pp. 496-514.

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Abstract

This paper considers the popularity and social significance of the gaming series Championship Manager/Football Manager. Sport-related games continue to be one of the most popular forms of digital gaming, and the series has proved to be one of the most successful of all time. Drawing on 32 interviews with game players and developers of this series, this paper argues that this series has proved particularly popular due to its 'intertextual' links to the sport of football, which allows this game to be drawn on as a resource in conversations and social networks. In particular, this paper argues that aspects of gaming, such as performativity and control, extend and cross-cut with wider social formations. Hence, the author argues that it is crucial that considerations of digital games seek to locate these within wider social and cultural patterns.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Digital games, everyday life, football, performativity, sport
Themes: Subjects / Themes > Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA075 Electronic computers. Computer science > QA076 Computer software
Subjects / Themes > G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV0557 Sports
Subjects outside of the University Themes
Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care
Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences > Centre for Social Research
Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Information, Communication & Society
Publisher: Routledge Taylor & Francis
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1369118X
Depositing User: H Kenna
Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2009 15:59
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2014 14:21
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/1450

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