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Inequalities in immunisation and breast feeding in an ethnically diverse urban area: cross-sectional study in Manchester, UK

Baker, D, Garrow, A and Shiels, C 2011, 'Inequalities in immunisation and breast feeding in an ethnically diverse urban area: cross-sectional study in Manchester, UK' , Epidemiol Community Health, 65 (4) , pp. 346-352.

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    Abstract

    Objectives - to examine inequalities in immunisation and breast feeding by ethnic group and their relation to relative deprivation. Design - cross-sectional study. Setting - Manchester, UK. Participants - 20203 children born in Manchester (2002-2007), who had been coded as of white, mixed, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and black or black British ethnicity in the Child Health System database. Main outcome measures - breast feeding at 2 weeks post partum; uptake of triple vaccine (diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus) at 16 weeks post partum; uptake of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR) by the age of 2. Results - black or black British infants had the highest rates of breast feeding at 2 weeks post partum (89%), and South Asian infants had the highest triple and MMR vaccination rates (Indian, 95%, 96%; Pakistani 95%, 95%; Bangladeshi 96%, 95%) after area level of deprivation, parity, parenthood status and age had been controlled for. White infants were least likely to be breast fed at 2 weeks post partum (36%), and to be vaccinated with triple (92%) and MMR vaccines (88%). Within the white ethnic group, lower percentages of immunisation and breast feeding were significantly associated with living in a deprived area and with increasing parity. This was not found within black or black British and Pakistani ethnic groups. Discussion - practices that are protective of child health were consistently less likely to be adopted by white mothers living in deprived areas. Methods of health education and service delivery that are designed for the general population are unlikely to be successful in this context, and evidence of effective interventions needs to be established.

    Item Type: Article
    Themes: Subjects / Themes > R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
    Health and Wellbeing
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care
    Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences > Centre for Social Justice Research
    Journal or Publication Title: Epidemiol Community Health
    Publisher: BMJ Group
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 0142-467X
    Related URLs:
    Depositing User: Users 47901 not found.
    Date Deposited: 26 Apr 2011 13:41
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 17:51
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/14943

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