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Community as commodity

Kreps, DG and Pearson, E 2008, Community as commodity , in: IFIP WG 9.5 International Working Conference on Virtuality and Society: Massive Virtual Communities, 1-2 July 2008, Leuphana University, Luneburg, Germany.

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    Abstract

    Despite utopian claims that the internet generally and Social Networking Sites (SNS) (including multi-user virtual environments, or MUVE) in particular herald a challenge to the dominance of capitalist ideologies in technological societies, there is growing evidence that SNS and MUVE are actually part of a hegemonic transnational agenda of conservative venture capital which reinforces hierarchies of consumption. By appropriating these various virtual social networks (either as part of the development of the infrastructure or ‘after the fact’), these SNS in fact demonstrate the continued and thriving hegemony of capitalism in the wired world. Using the works of Gramsci and Gill to provide a critical grounding, this paper will examine some of the flagship SNS of Web 2.0 particularly Facebook and explore how, rather than challenging existing top-down hierarchies and structures, these social networks have in fact been appropriated by them.

    Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
    Additional Information: IFIP (International Federation for Information Processing)
    Themes: Subjects / Themes > Z Bibliography. Library Science. Information Resources > Z665 Library Science. Information Science
    Subjects / Themes > J Political Science > JC Political theory
    Subjects / Themes > H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
    Subjects outside of the University Themes
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Business & Law > Salford Business School > Centre for Digital Business
    Refereed: Yes
    Related URLs:
    Depositing User: DGP Kreps
    Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2009 15:32
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 16:55
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/1665

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