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Ecological equilibrium on biological activated carbon

Scholz, M and Martin, R 1997, 'Ecological equilibrium on biological activated carbon' , Water Research, 31 (12) , pp. 2959-2968.

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    Abstract

    This paper examines the potential of a biological activity control system (BACS) for biological activated carbon (BAC) in comparison to granular activated carbon (GAC) for the treatment of potable water. The overall objective of the project is to produce drinking water of a higher quality more economically by developing a BACS for exhausted GAC that can be transformed to BAC by the development of a natural biofilm during the bio-regeneration mode. The research therefore may be interesting for water companies and the activated carbon industry. Findings show that the lifetime of a GAC filter can be significantly extended by maintaining an active biofilm that has to be controlled in order to avoid filter clogging. The most important parameters are dissolved oxygen (DO), pH and a correct balance of nutrients, which enables a natural control of the biomass, pH control was required to maintain an optimal bacteria-protozoa level. Excessive growth of filamentous bacteria can be prevented by a decrease in I-)O, increase in pH and the reduction of one essential nutrient, e.g. total phosphorus (P). Total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) values were reduced by bioactivity. DO, turbidity anti suspended solids (SS) values were kept in acceptable ranges with respect to drinking water objectives. Plants without a significant population of protozoa deliver turbid low quality effluent high on SS and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). It was possible to control the biofilm on GAC containing a natural biofilm and BAC during the bio-regeneration mode. Natural and artificial bio-regeneration lead to similar performance characteristics.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: GAC, BAC, comparison between GAC and BAC systems, biological regeneration, biofilm development, pH/DO control, protozoa-bacteria equilibrium, organic carbon removal, phosphorus removal
    Themes: Built and Human Environment
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology
    Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Computing, Science and Engineering
    Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Computing, Science and Engineering > Civil Engineering Research Centre
    Journal or Publication Title: Water Research
    Publisher: IWA Publishing
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 0043-1354
    Depositing User: Users 47901 not found.
    Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2011 10:46
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:00
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/16773

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