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Neural network simulation of the chemical oxygen demand reduction in a biological activated carbon filter

Mohanty , S, Scholz, M and Slater, M 2002, 'Neural network simulation of the chemical oxygen demand reduction in a biological activated carbon filter' , Water and Environment Journal, 16 (1) , pp. 58-64.

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    Abstract

    This paper is primarily aimed at encouraging further use of neural networks by the water- and wastewater treatment industry. The study demonstrates the principle of using a network method of simulating the performance of a biological activated-carbon filter based on a biological water-quality assessment and measurements of pH and dissolved oxygen during the bio-regeneration mode with untreated river water. Protozoa, worms, rotifers, bacteria, fungi and algae were used as biological parameters. The neural network model could reasonably estimate the chemical oxygen demand reduction in an exhausted filter. The neural network model gave much better results than a second-order polynomial regression model; however, a much larger database is required than is currently available.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Biological activated carbon, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen, neural network, pH, water treatment
    Themes: Built and Human Environment
    Energy
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology
    Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Computing, Science and Engineering
    Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Computing, Science and Engineering > Civil Engineering Research Centre
    Journal or Publication Title: Water and Environment Journal
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 1747-6593
    Depositing User: Users 47901 not found.
    Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2011 11:43
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:00
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/16778

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