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Fresh air: people cannot get enough of it

James, P, Greening, K and Champion, M 2011, Fresh air: people cannot get enough of it , in: Sustainable Well-Being, 10 Sept 2011, Wrexham.

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    Abstract

    Applying the concept of ecosystem services, a core concept in the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and explored more fully in the recent UK National Ecosystem Assessment, asks that the relationship between people and the natural environment is re-framed. This necessitates examining the values that individuals and communities place on the natural environment, and the words and language used to describe the benefits. The authors of this poster focus their attention on Wigan Flashes, a Local Nature Reserves in the post-industrial town of Wigan, and report on a survey of visitors in which their purpose for visiting the Flashes was identified. This survey is part of more extensive work in which a rapid ecosystem service assessment will also be conducted. That work, when complete, will be reported elsewhere. Within the survey 250 interviewees responded to questions which explored the benefits of visiting the Flashes. More people visited the Flashes for physical (68%) health and well-being benefits than for psychological (38%) or social (6%) reasons. A major theme emerging from the questionnaires was the association with “fresh air”: a term particularly prevalent in the early history of public health. The possibility of using this term as part of a social marketing strategy in order to encourage people to engage in more active life styles is explored.

    Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Health ecology, umwelt, ecosystem services
    Themes: Built and Human Environment
    Health and Wellbeing
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology
    Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Environment and Life Sciences
    Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
    Refereed: Yes
    Depositing User: Professor Philip James
    Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2011 09:43
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:09
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/17614

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