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The future of surgical nursing and enhanced recovery programmes

Mitchell, M 2011, 'The future of surgical nursing and enhanced recovery programmes' , British Journal of Nursing, 20 (16) , pp. 978-984.

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    Abstract

    Medical advances have led to the development of an increasing number of enhanced recovery programmes for patients undergoing surgery in the United Kingdom. Enhanced recovery is concerned with helping patients to get better sooner after an operation by following a meticulous regime of care. Such programmes encompass explicit, medically-driven protocols, although their practical application is largely undertaken by nurses. However, beyond the professional knowledge and skills required to aid such programmes, nursing knowledge has so far contributed little to this rapidly developing aspect of surgery. Nevertheless, nursing has much to offer by the future creation of centrally co-ordinated, surgical nursing units focussing on the patients’ holistic experience. This article intends to briefly describe enhanced recovery, identify aspects of nursing knowledge that can have a positive influence and outline practical changes to assist the development of such programmes thereby benefiting all patients undergoing elective surgery.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Enhanced recovery, modernizing practices, nurses’ role, psychological care, sociological care, information provision
    Themes: Health and Wellbeing
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care
    Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences > Centre for Nursing, Midwifery & Social Work Research
    Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences
    Journal or Publication Title: British Journal of Nursing
    Publisher: Mark Allen Publishing
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 0966-0461
    Depositing User: MJ Mitchell
    Date Deposited: 19 Sep 2011 09:57
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:09
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/17642

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