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IS success and failure: the problem of scale

Kreps, DG and Richardson, H 2007, 'IS success and failure: the problem of scale' , The Political Quarterly, 78 (3) , pp. 439-446.

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    Abstract

    In this article we consider Information Systems (IS) failure, and how social and technical factors combine and contribute to project setbacks. This is a timely re¯ection, given the turbulence and confusion facing what has been described as the largest non-military IT project in history Ðthe Connecting for Health (CfH) agenda part of the National Programme for IT in the NHS. Firstly, we catalogue some predecessors of CfH producing costly IT project failures. We then analyse `failures' in IS and discuss some theories put forward to contextualise failure. This then provides the framework for a more in-depth discussion of the CfH agenda. We discuss the way forward, suggesting that `joined-up-thinking' is necessary with the adoption of the government's own interoperability framework. We conclude with the message `think local, think modular', suggesting that good practice should be built on and that trust should be a key word for future IS project developments.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: IS failure, public-sector IT projects, social constructivism, interoperability, Connecting for Health, web services
    Themes: Built and Human Environment
    Energy
    Health and Wellbeing
    Media, Digital Technology and the Creative Economy
    Memory, Text and Place
    Subjects outside of the University Themes
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Business & Law > Salford Business School > Centre for Digital Business
    Journal or Publication Title: The Political Quarterly
    Publisher: Blackwell Publishing
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 1467-923X
    Depositing User: HJ Richardson
    Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2011 14:17
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:11
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/17944

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