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Comparing the impact of conventional pesticide and use of a transgenic pest-resistant crop on the beneficial carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius

Mulligan, E, Ferry, N, Jouanin, L, Walters, K, Port, G and Gatehouse, A 2006, 'Comparing the impact of conventional pesticide and use of a transgenic pest-resistant crop on the beneficial carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius' , Pest management science, 62 (10) , pp. 999-1012.

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    Abstract

    The potential impact of a chemical pesticide control method has been compared with that of transgenic plants expressing a protease inhibitor conferring insect resistance by utilising a tritrophic system comprising the crop plant Brassica napus (L.) (Oilseed rape), the pest mollusc Deroceras reticulatum (Müller) and the predatory carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius (Illiger). Cypermethrin, as the most widely used pesticide in UK oilseed rape (OSR) cultivation, was selected as the conventional treatment. OSR expressing a cysteine protease inhibitor, oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1), was the transgenic comparator. In feeding trials, D. reticulatum showed no significant long-term effects on measured life history parameters (survival, weight gain, food consumption) as a result of exposure to either the cypermethrin or OC-1 treatment. However, D. reticulatum was able to respond to the presence of the dietary inhibitor by producing two novel proteases following exposure to OC-1-expressing OSR. Similarly, P. melanarius showed no detectable alterations in mortality, weight gain or food consumption when feeding on D. reticulatum previously fed either pesticide-contaminated or GM plant material. Furthermore, as with the slug, a novel form of protease, approximately M(r) 27 kDa, was induced in the carabid in response to feeding on slugs fed OC-1-expressing OSR.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1), cypermethrin, beneficial predators, carabid, transgenic oil seed rape, tritrophic interactions
    Themes: Built and Human Environment
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Environment and Life Sciences
    Journal or Publication Title: Pest management science
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 1526-498X
    Depositing User: Dr Natalie Ferry
    Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2011 15:07
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:11
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/17961

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