Skip to the content

Sound fields near building facades: comparison of finite and semi-infinite reflectors on a rigid ground plane

Hopkins, C and Lam, YW 2009, 'Sound fields near building facades: comparison of finite and semi-infinite reflectors on a rigid ground plane' , Applied Acoustics, 70 (2) , pp. 300-308.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Download (445kB) | Preview

    Abstract

    The sound field in front of, and close to a building facade is relevant to the measurement and prediction of environmental noise and sound insulation. For simplicity it is often assumed that the facade can be treated as a semi-infinite reflector, however in the low-frequency range (50–200 Hz) this is no longer appropriate as the wavelengths are similar or larger than the facade dimensions. Scale model measurements and predictions using integral equation methods have been used to investigate the effect of diffraction on the sound field in front of finite size reflectors. For the situation that is commonly encountered in front of building facades, the results indicate that diffraction effects are only likely to be significant in the low-frequency range (50–200 Hz) when the façade dimensions are less than 5 m. This assumes that there is a point source close to the ground and microphones at a height of 1.2 or 1.5 m, at a distance between 1 and 2 m in front of the façade. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Item Type: Article
    Themes: Built and Human Environment
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Computing, Science and Engineering > Acoustics Research Centre
    Journal or Publication Title: Applied Acoustics
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 0003-682X
    Related URLs:
    Depositing User: YW Lam
    Date Deposited: 10 Oct 2011 09:59
    Last Modified: 22 Jul 2014 11:09
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/18052

    Actions (login required)

    Edit record (repository staff only)

    Downloads per month over past year

    View more statistics