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Living with helicopter noise - evaluating sound insulation techniques for domestic dwellings using real helicopters

Kerry, G, Waddington, DC and Lomax1, C 2011, 'Living with helicopter noise - evaluating sound insulation techniques for domestic dwellings using real helicopters' , Building Services Engineering Research and Technology . (In Press)

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        Abstract

        Specific remedial works designed to improve sound installation and reduce the noise level produced by helicopters inside dwellings are described. The theoretical problems and practical solutions to installing high performance acoustic insulation to a traditional property in the UK are presented. A novel application of ISO 140-5 is presented using real helicopters to measure sound insulation in-situ in the presence of multiple flanking transmission paths. Dedicated field trials to evaluate the performance of such acoustic double-glazing and associated modifications systems were performed and the precautions taken to minimise measurement uncertainties over the extended time period of the trials are detailed. The field trials involved the use of military training helicopters following selected flight paths around the property while noise level measurements were made internally and externally, before and after replacement of the existing single glazed windows and attenuated ventilation units were installed. The results show that after replacing the main windows with acoustic insulated glazing units, insulation levels of 40dB or above are achieved in most rooms. The results also illustrate the importance of effectively addressing ventilation when windows are replaced. It is concluded that despite complications due to sound flanking and regulatory ventilation, the use of acoustic double-glazing units and properly attenuated ventilation units can effectively reduce helicopter noise in suitable dwellings.

        Item Type: Article
        Themes: Built and Human Environment
        Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Computing, Science and Engineering > Acoustics Research Centre
        Journal or Publication Title: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
        Publisher: Sage
        Refereed: Yes
        ISSN: 0143-6244
        Depositing User: DC Waddington
        Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2011 11:33
        Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:15
        URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/18582

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