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Mobile forms of communication and the transformation of relations between the public and private spheres

Jeffery, R 2008, 'Mobile forms of communication and the transformation of relations between the public and private spheres' , in: Popular media and communication: essays on publics, practices and processes , Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle, UK, pp. 5-23.

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    Abstract

    Stress is placed upon contextual issues and for this reason we will theoretically consider aspects of the modern society that are working in conjunction with the mobile phone to alter the public/private dichotomy. The article focuses upon the themes of: emergent practices, community, authority, domestication and etiquette, and notions of space. Rather than focusing solely on perceived change we shall also consider continuities and adaptation in social action, drawing on a range of ethnographic research.

    Item Type: Book Section
    Editors: Ross, K and Price, S
    Additional Information: Edited volume of papers from the MeCCSA 2007 conference held in Coventry, UK in January 2007. Published in USIR with the permission of Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Mobile phones, public/private dichotomy, technology, social practices, domestication
    Themes: Subjects / Themes > T Technology > T Technology (General)
    Subjects / Themes > H Social Sciences > HE Transportation and Communications
    Subjects outside of the University Themes
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences
    Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences
    Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences > School of Humanities, Languages & Social Sciences
    Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
    Refereed: Yes
    ISBN: 9781847186263
    Related URLs:
    Depositing User: R Jeffery
    Date Deposited: 21 Apr 2009 14:32
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 16:56
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/1882

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