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Patient's perceptions of day surgery: a literature review

Mitchell, MJ 1999, 'Patient's perceptions of day surgery: a literature review' , Ambulatory Surgery, 7 (2) , pp. 65-73.

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    Abstract

    Medical and pharmacological advances in surgery have contributed to the current and continued growth of day surgery. As the majority of adult UK elective surgery now takes place within day surgery facilities, these changes will inevitably have an impact upon nursing intervention. Past nursing practices may have to undergo a period of redevelopment in order to meet these changes and the logical first step towards any innovative change must involve acquiring the views of patients. The main themes to emerge related to nursing practice, information provision, experiences within day surgery and recovery at home. The overwhelming principle challenge was that of information provision followed closely by postoperative pain management.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Day surgery, satisfaction, ambulatory surgery, anxiety, patient attitude, ambulatory surgery
    Themes: Subjects / Themes > R Medicine > RT Nursing
    Subjects / Themes > R Medicine > RD Surgery
    Subjects / Themes > B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
    Health and Wellbeing
    Subjects outside of the University Themes
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care
    Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences
    Journal or Publication Title: Ambulatory Surgery
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 09666532
    Depositing User: Institutional Repository
    Date Deposited: 23 Apr 2009 11:31
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 16:56
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/1903

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