Skip to the content

Multilocus sequence typing of Bartonella henselae in the United Kingdom indicates that only a few, uncommon sequence types are associated with zoonotic disease

Chaloner, GL, Harrison, TG, Coyne, KP, Aanensen, DM and Birtles, RJ 2011, 'Multilocus sequence typing of Bartonella henselae in the United Kingdom indicates that only a few, uncommon sequence types are associated with zoonotic disease' , Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 49 (6) , pp. 2132-2137.

[img] PDF - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (188kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Bartonella henselae is one of the most common zoonotic agents acquired from companion animals (cats) in industrialized countries. Nonetheless, although the prevalence of infections in cats is high, the number of human cases reported is relatively low. One hypothesis for this discrepancy is that B. henselae strains vary in their zoonotic potential. To test this hypothesis, we employed structured sampling to explore the population structure of B. henselae in the United Kingdom and to determine the distribution of strains associated with zoonotic disease within this structure. A total of 118 B. henselae strains were delineated into 12 sequence types (STs) using multilocus sequence typing. We observed that most (85%) of the zoonosis-associated strains belonged to only three genotypes, i.e., ST2, ST5, and ST8. Conversely, most (74%) of the feline isolates belonged to ST4, ST6, and ST7. The difference in host association of ST2, ST5, and ST8 (zoonosis associated) and ST6 (feline) was statistically significant (P < 0.05), indicating that a few, uncommon STs were responsible for the majority of symptomatic human infections.

Item Type: Article
Themes: Subjects outside of the University Themes
Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0095-1137
Depositing User: Users 29196 not found.
Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2011 12:02
Last Modified: 03 Jun 2014 08:04
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/19235

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year