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Online identity, reputation and professional practice

Hook, A and Bodell, SJ 2010, Online identity, reputation and professional practice , in: COT Annual Conference 2010, June 2010, Brighton UK. (Unpublished)

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    Abstract

    Verdonck and Ryan (2008) suggest that as occupational therapists we need to embrace technology and move with the times as we “can no longer afford to be technophobes” (p255). Occupational therapists are using the internet to gather information, to enhance evidence based practice and for CPD (Bodell et al 2009), however it can also be assumed that occupational therapists are included in the increasing number of people engaged in online shopping, social networking, gaming and other online leisure pursuits. Each online activity can leave a virtual footprint, and a combination of activities creates on online identity for the individual involved. This identity may be revealed via simple methods, for example by ‘googling’ or by more sophisticated methods that allow the searcher to amalgamate pseudonyms for example. Online identity is closely linked to reputation (Grohol 2006), and reputation may be fundamental in relation to professional practice and career development. It is suggested therefore that online identity should be acknowledged and managed rather than ignored. This seminar will consider how online identity can enhance or damage individual professional reputation and how to build and manage a useful online identity. There will be opportunity to share concerns and solutions, and to consider the benefits of online identity and reputation management for the profession as a whole.

    Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Lecture)
    Themes: Health and Wellbeing
    Media, Digital Technology and the Creative Economy
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Health Sciences > Centre for Health Sciences Research
    Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Health Sciences
    Refereed: Yes
    Depositing User: Ms Angela D Hook
    Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2012 14:33
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:20
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/19323

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