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AFLPs: genetic markers for paternity studies in newts (Triturus vulgaris)

Jehle, R, Whitlock, A and Sztatecsny, M 2006, 'AFLPs: genetic markers for paternity studies in newts (Triturus vulgaris)' , Amphibia-Reptilia, 27 (1) , pp. 126-129.

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Abstract

DNA-based genetic markers can reveal paternity whenever the direct assignment of fathers to offspring is precluded by multiple matings and internal fertilisation. Microsatellites are the current marker of choice in many behavioural studies, and have revealed important insights into genetic mating systems of European amphibians. However, the number of amphibian species for which the time-consuming designing of locus-specific microsatellite primers was successful is still limited, and the cross-utilisation of existing markers to closely related taxa seems to have a particularly low success rate. Allozymes can infer parentage without a species-specific protocol, but, due to their low degree of polymorphism, in mate choice experiments require the a priori screening of individuals. Dominant markers such as RAPDs successfully identified closely-related amphibian species and their hybrids, but might be less suited to distinguish between closely related individuals with a putatively high frequency of shared bands.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Genetics, paternity, European newts
Themes: Subjects / Themes > Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology > QH426 Genetics
Subjects / Themes > Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Subjects outside of the University Themes
Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology
Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Amphibia-Reptilia
Publisher: Kluwer
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0173-5373
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Institutional Repository
Date Deposited: 27 Aug 2009 14:55
Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 15:58
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/2218

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