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Case study: Design and operation of sustainable urban infiltration ponds treating storm runoff

Zheng, J, Nanbakhsh, H and Scholz, M 2006, 'Case study: Design and operation of sustainable urban infiltration ponds treating storm runoff' , Journal of Urban Planning and Development, 132 (1) , pp. 36-41.

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Abstract

Combined wetlands and infiltration ponds are cost-effective ‘end of pipe’ drainage solutions that can be applied for local source control as part of urban development and regeneration. The aims of this case study were to assess constraints associated with the planning, design, and operation of these ponds, the influence of aquatic plants on infiltration rates, and the water treatment potential. Storm runoff was first stored and treated in a constructed wetland before it overflowed into parallel infiltration ponds of which one was planted and the other one was unplanted. Three international best management practice design guidelines failed in practice. The presence of macrophytes in one infiltration pond had no significant influence on the drainage properties. The water quality of both ponds was not acceptable for water reuse directly after the system setup. Filamentous green algae within the unplanted pond were blooming in spring and summer creating an aesthetically unpleasing pond surface area. After 1 year of operation, barley straw and Carassius auratus (common goldfish) were introduced successfully to control the growth of algae.

Item Type: Article
Themes: Subjects outside of the University Themes
Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Computing, Science and Engineering > Civil Engineering Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Urban Planning and Development
Publisher: American Society of Civil Engineers
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 07339488
Depositing User: Users 29196 not found.
Date Deposited: 31 May 2012 12:27
Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 18:28
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/22797

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