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An investigation into whether the level of experience affects the way that CMHNs assess the level of risk from clients

Murphy, N 2006, An investigation into whether the level of experience affects the way that CMHNs assess the level of risk from clients , MSc by research thesis, Manchester Metropolitan University.

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    Abstract

    This was a small scale study that focussed on whether the level of experience affected the way that Community Mental Health Nurses (CMHN) assessed the risk of violence from their clients. Ethical approval was gained and 22 participants took part in the study. A mixed method approach was adopted utilising a quantitative phase followed by a qualitative phase of data collection. Each were separately analysed and the results were, that regardless of level of experience, the CMHNs believed that they were the best at assessing risks compared to all other Multidisciplinary Team members. Further, the more experienced the staff member the more control they tried to impart on the perceived risk situation, whereas the less experienced members of staff tended to withdraw and allow other members of staff to deal with the situation. Finally it was found that although training was found to be important in helping the staff to identify and manage risks; observation of live situations that were well managed was more influential in their interpretation of how they should react. The more experienced staff utilising more ‘life skills’ experience than the less experienced. These finding will have an impact on training and on the future recruitment of staff to community positions.

    Item Type: Thesis (MSc by research)
    Contributors: Wibberley, C(Supervisor)
    Themes: Health and Wellbeing
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Health & Social Care > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences
    Depositing User: Neil Murphy
    Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2012 14:20
    Last Modified: 18 Feb 2014 14:00
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/23344

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