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The use of ethnographic accounts for understanding culture in construction

Rooke, JA and Seymour, D 2000, The use of ethnographic accounts for understanding culture in construction , in: Joint Meeting of CIB Working Commissions W55/W65 and Task Groups TG23/TG31/TG35, 13th-15th September 2000, University of Reading.

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    Abstract

    Culture, in the sense of a way of life, is increasingly seen as a topic worthy of study within the construction management community. There are two major reasons for this: i) recognition that the changed practices which the industry is required to undergo are inhibited by convictions about what is normal, right and proper, i.e. the existing culture; ii) recognition that increasingly global markets require people from many different nationalities and backgrounds to work together. However, while there is agreement that culture is important, there is less agreement about how most usefully to conceptualise it, study it and demonstrate the ways in which its assumed importance actually manifests itself. A major feature of the disagreement is between those who try to achieve a 'deep' understanding of a culture by extensive participation in it - the ethnographic route; and those who seek to provide an objective account, analysed into components which may be used as factors in a variable analysis. Hitherto, in construction industry research, it has been the second approach that researchers have generally taken. In this paper, we present some findings of a study of construction projects which has taken the former route and consider what can be learnt from them.

    Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
    Themes: Subjects / Themes > H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
    Subjects / Themes > T Technology > TH Building construction
    Built and Human Environment
    Subjects outside of the University Themes
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of the Built Environment
    Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of the Built Environment > Salford Centre for Research & Innovation (SCRI)
    Refereed: Yes
    Depositing User: Users 29196 not found.
    Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2009 11:02
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 17:01
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/2602

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