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Men doing bands: Making, shaping and performing masculinities through popular music

Bogdanovic, D 2009, Men doing bands: Making, shaping and performing masculinities through popular music , PhD thesis, Salford : University of Salford.

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    Abstract

    Informed by the interdisciplinarity inherent in popular music studies, the thesis relies on qualitative research methods such as participant observation and semistructured interview to examine popular music masculinities. Methodologically, it is underpinned by a sociological understanding of music as practice as well as a process of enculturation, permeated by manifold musical and identity forming activities. Through an examination of a range of music settings such as those of "the band", live performance and online presence, the thesis foregrounds the multiplicity of "everyday" musical masculinities thus shifting the focus away from the most visible, popularised and the spectacular masculine types. The key themes addressed by ethnographic and participatory inquiry include: gender acculturating activities such as listening and collecting of musical knowledge and artefacts, and socialising in popular music spaces; gendering through musical practices inherent within a setting of the band; performing live and authenticating masculinities through series of verbal, visual and musical strategies; and embracing novel representational tools such as social networking sites to increase the band's visibility and represent the male body. By engaging with music as practice and music in context of everyday life, and by understanding gender as constituted through a series of culturally and musically informed activities, the thesis demonstrates that a wide range of masculine gender identities comprise creative and cultural dynamics within bands. Finally, the thesis maintains the dialogue with the existing writing on gender within the field of popular music studies, extending the arguments about multiplicity of gender positions and implications of gendering activities. Significantly, it challenges the understanding of popular music masculinity as a monolithic entity, providing an opening for further dialogue between all musicians, hoping to result in enhanced understanding of practical and ideological challenges faced by both men and women involved in the making and performance of music.

    Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
    Contributors: Longhurst, BJ(Supervisor)
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences > School of Arts & Media > Communication, Cultural & Media Studies Research Centre
    Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences > School of Humanities, Languages & Social Sciences
    Depositing User: Institutional Repository
    Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2012 14:34
    Last Modified: 19 Feb 2014 13:48
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/26583

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