Skip to the content

Major incidents in high hazard industries and development of risk regulation: case studies in developed and developing countries

Collinson, GS 2010, Major incidents in high hazard industries and development of risk regulation: case studies in developed and developing countries , PhD thesis, Salford : University of Salford.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Repository staff only until 01 January 2015.

Download (14MB) | Request a copy

    Abstract

    This work considers the development of risk regulation in high hazard industries, and explores differences by conducting case studies across a number of developed and developing countries. It draws on concepts from a variety of fields: risk perception, the structure of society, the nature of the law and regulation, and the management of industrial risk. The project begins with a consideration of risk perception in society to give a wider context to the research, and explores the implications for risk regulation. A number of theories of regulation are described followed by a more detailed consideration of the regulation of risk and approaches in the high hazard industry. These influences are then assessed and conclusions drawn through a three stage process. Firstly a theoretical framework is established that incorporates theories from some diverse disciplines, such as systems thinking, analysis of regulation, and safety management. Secondly, case studies are conducted to draw comparisons across different societies and to explore the validity of this framework. Finally, reflecting on these differences, a conceptual model is developed to provide an explanation of past experience, help predict future consequences and enable an improvement in the effectiveness of new regulation. The research has identified key influences, and three additional variables have emerged; risk temperament, risk pathways, and the impact of globalisation. The hypothesis was that the processes of risk regulation in societies are influenced by serious incidents in different ways and that such processes could be modelled to help understanding and support the effective development of risk regulation. Through objective analysis, this has been demonstrated, and, in addition, a modified conceptual model has been developed to enable further research in this important area.

    Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
    Contributors: Wright, F(Supervisor)
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Business & Law > Salford Business School > International Strategy People Management & Salford Law
    Depositing User: Institutional Repository
    Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2012 14:34
    Last Modified: 17 Feb 2014 13:43
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/26622

    Actions (login required)

    Edit record (repository staff only)

    Downloads per month over past year

    View more statistics