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The translation of English euphemistic expressions into Arabic in D.H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover and Jane Austen's Emma

Hayajneh, L 2010, The translation of English euphemistic expressions into Arabic in D.H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover and Jane Austen's Emma , PhD thesis, Salford : University of Salford.

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    Abstract

    This thesis considers English euphemisms and their translation into Arabic from a linguistic and translational perspective into Arabic. It consists of five main chapters. In the first chapter, the researcher discusses the reasons for addressing this topic. The definition, forms, and uses of euphemisms are addressed in detail. The nature of euphemism in Arabic, sometimes referred to in Arabic as talattuf, is addressed. In chapter one the hypotheses of the study are also introduced. The primary hypotheses are: 1. There is a correlative relationship between a euphemistic expression in English and its equivalent in Arabic: an English euphemism is normally best translated into another euphemism in Arabic. 2. When difficulties exist in recognising the scope of meaning (lexical, phrasal, or sentential) of English euphemisms, problems in translating them into Arabic are also found. 3. When English euphemisms are translated literally, the target language text loses its original communicative value. The secondary hypotheses are: 1. When translating a metaphorical English euphemism into Arabic, the Arabic counterpart is typically a metaphorical euphemism as well. 2. When translating a metonymical English euphemism into Arabic, the Arabic counterpart is typically a metonymical euphemism as well. 3. When translating a euphemistic English overstatement / understatement into Arabic, the Arabic counterpart is typically a euphemistic overstatement / understatement as well. 4. When translating a euphemistic English reversal into Arabic, the Arabic counterpart is typically a euphemistic reversal as well. In chapter two, the researcher moves on to the relationships between euphemism and other translation-related issues. He addresses the relations between euphemism and lexical meaning, and those between euphemism and genre, register, and text types. IX

    Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
    Contributors: Dickins, J(Supervisor)
    Additional Information:
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences
    Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences > School of Humanities, Languages & Social Sciences
    Depositing User: Institutional Repository
    Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2012 14:34
    Last Modified: 17 Feb 2014 14:40
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/26710

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