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Unamerican Views: Why US-developed models of press-state relations don't apply to the rest of the world

Archetti, C 2008, 'Unamerican Views: Why US-developed models of press-state relations don't apply to the rest of the world' , Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture, 5 (3) , pp. 4-26.

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    Abstract

    The article shows the limitations of the 'indexing' hypothesis, an influential conceptualization of state-press relations based on the notion that the media tend to reproduce the range of debate within political elites. The hypothesis, as confirmed by an international comparative investigation of the elite press coverage of 9/11 in the US, Italy, France, and Pakistan, cannot be applied outside the American context. The analysis finds that the variation in the levels of correlation between elite press coverage and governmental discourse are explained by previously neglected variables: national interest, national journalistic culture, and editorial policy within each media organization. The article argues that more international comparative research and multidisciplinary approaches are needed in order to renew old paradigms, especially at a time when the distinction between foreign and domestic politics is disappearing.

    Item Type: Article
    Themes: Subjects / Themes > J Political Science > JZ International relations
    Subjects / Themes > J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
    Subjects / Themes > N Fine Arts > NE Print media
    Subjects / Themes > H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
    Subjects outside of the University Themes
    Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences > School of Arts & Media > Communication, Cultural & Media Studies Research Centre
    Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences
    Colleges and Schools > College of Arts & Social Sciences > School of Humanities, Languages & Social Sciences
    Journal or Publication Title: Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture
    Publisher: University of Westminster
    Refereed: Yes
    ISSN: 1744-6708
    Depositing User: C Archetti
    Date Deposited: 06 Dec 2010 11:59
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 17:02
    URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/2731

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