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A narrative review of maternal physical activity during labour and its effects upon length of first stage

Hollins-Martin, CJ and Martin, CR 2013, 'A narrative review of maternal physical activity during labour and its effects upon length of first stage' , Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 19 (1) , pp. 44-49.

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Abstract

Women in western countries generally lie semi-recumbent during first stage of labour, when perhaps it is more natural to move around. Consequently carers are unaware of what constitutes instinctive behaviours and their outcomes. With this in mind, a structured narrative review of the literature identified what prior research has shown about the impact of maternal movement upon length of first stage; results are ambiguous, with 11 studies reporting no alteration to length and 7 reporting shortening. These studies fail to adequately detail time spent mobilising and what in fact constituted walking, squatting, upright, lying lateral, supine or semi-recumbent, and their direct effects upon progress of first stage. Advancements in knowledge are required to progress understanding about maternal activity during labour and its outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Themes: Health and Wellbeing
Schools: Schools > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences > Centre for Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences Research
Schools > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1744-3881
Related URLs:
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: CJ Hollins-Martin
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2013 11:58
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2015 23:43
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/28398

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