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A critical success factors framework that includes leadership competencies for successful delivery of projects

Atencio, M 2012, A critical success factors framework that includes leadership competencies for successful delivery of projects , PhD thesis, University of Salford.

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Abstract

Critical success factors are common in projects today as a means of assessing projects (Nixon, Harrington and Parker, 2011). Critical success factors as covered in project management literature surprisingly does not usually mention the project manager’s leadership competence as a success factor for projects (Turner and Muller, 2005). Researchers over the years have developed several critical success factor frameworks to access projects, but none of the frameworks to date include leadership competencies of the project manager as a critical success factor, nor are they used as a tool to help project managers achieve success. This study extends the work of researchers who have created a number of critical success factor frameworks (Koutsikouri, Austin and Dainty, 2008; Belassi & Tukel, 2006; Spalek, 2005; Westerveld, 2003; Cooke-Davies, 2002; Pinto and Slevin, 1989; DeWit, 1988; Morris and Hough, 1987; Lock, 1984; Baker, Murphy, and Fisher, 1983; Cleland and King, 1983; Martin, 1979; Westerveld, 2003) by including leadership competencies as a critical success factor, and by extending the use of the framework as a tool to help project managers achieve success. The unit of study for this research is the IT project managers. Quantitative and qualitative research was utilized to test the updated critical success factor criterion. The updated framework is not intended to be used as an evaluation tool to determine project success, but as a tool for project managers to help achieve success. Key findings include: (1) There are significant differences between project manager success, project management success, and project success (2) Charismatic leadership and people-oriented/relations-oriented leadership have negative connotations associated with them. Charismatic leaders are viewed as not having follow-through. People-oriented/relations-oriented leadership are viewed as biased and ineffective do to the subjectivity of the decisions made, and actions taken that are heavily influenced by favorable relationships.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Contributors: Egbu, C (Supervisor)
Themes: Subjects outside of the University Themes
Schools: Schools > School of the Built Environment
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: M Atencio
Date Deposited: 12 Dec 2013 23:50
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2015 23:55
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/30638

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