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'Being kinder to myself ’: A prospective comparative study, exploring post-trauma therapy outcome measures, for two groups of clients, receiving either cognitive behaviour therapy or cognitive behaviour therapy and compassionate mind training

Beaumont, EA, Galpin, AJ and Jenkins, PE 2012, ''Being kinder to myself ’: A prospective comparative study, exploring post-trauma therapy outcome measures, for two groups of clients, receiving either cognitive behaviour therapy or cognitive behaviour therapy and compassionate mind training' , Counselling Psychology Review, 27 (1) , 31-43..

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Abstract

Background/Aims/Objectives: This prospective, comparative outcome study was designed to contrast the relative impact of differing therapeutic interventions for trauma victims, carried out by the same therapist. Methods/Methodology: A non-random convenience sample (N=32) of participants, referred for therapy following a traumatic incident, were randomly assigned to receive up to 12 sessions of either Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), or CBT coupled with Compassionate Mind Training (CMT). A repeated measures design was used and data was analysed using analysis of variance. Data was gathered pre-therapy and post-therapy, using three self-report questionnaires (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; Impact of Events Scale; the Self-Compassion Scale). Results/Findings: Results supported two of the three original hypotheses. Participants in both conditions experienced a highly statistically significant reduction in symptoms of anxiety, depression, avoidant behaviour, intrusive thoughts and hyper-arousal symptoms post-therapy. Participants in the combined CBT and CMT condition developed statistically significant higher self-compassion scores post-therapy than the CBT-only group [F(1,30)=4.657, p≤.05]. There was no significant difference between treatment groups. Discussion/Conclusions: The results suggest that CMT may be a useful addition to CBT for clients suffering with trauma-related symptoms. In conclusion, high levels of self-compassion are linked to a decrease in anxiety and depression and trauma-related symptoms. Keywords: trauma; cognitive behaviour therapy; compassionate mind training; counselling psychology.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health Sciences > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Schools > School of Health Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Counselling Psychology Review
Publisher: The British Psychological Society
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0269-6975
Depositing User: S Rafiq
Date Deposited: 09 Jul 2014 17:06
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2016 09:02
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/32025

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