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An analysis of the relationship between airport systems and operations and the impact the efficiency of this cycle can have on environmental emissions

Boyle, DL 2014, An analysis of the relationship between airport systems and operations and the impact the efficiency of this cycle can have on environmental emissions , MPhil thesis, University of Salford.

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Abstract

This thesis presents the analysis of the relationship between airport systems and operations and the impact the efficiency of this cycle can have on environmental emissions. Simulations of the existing and hypothetical relationships between the buildings existing services and operations are developed using the quantitative methodology, so allowing valid comparisons across the models. Although these systems and building efficiency techniques are well discussed in the literature in the light of different reduction techniques, this research has a different approach. The simulations allow analysis using a variety of hypothetical relationship patterns. The first simulation (Phase One) is the existing service and operations relationship. Results are analysed on a quantitative analysis technique basis to produce performance metrics. The performance metrics to be compared are the kWh and CO2 emissions from the plants providing the comfort conditions. The first hypothetical relationship (Phase Two) manipulates the building service, to be provided only on operational demand. Results from the simulation are analysed on a comparative basis with the performance metrics from Phase One. The second hypothetical relationship (Phase Three) manipulates both the operation and service. The second simulation manipulates the buildings operation, and the service to be provided on the hypothetical operational demand in an attempt to reduce the CO2 emissions. Results from the second simulation are analysed on a comparative basis with the performance metrics from Phase Two.

Item Type: Thesis (MPhil)
Themes: Built and Human Environment
Energy
Schools: Schools > Salford Business School > Business and Management Research Centre
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: DL Boyle
Date Deposited: 12 Sep 2014 16:49
Last Modified: 29 Oct 2015 00:46
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/32061

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