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Economic benefits of contemporary earth construction in low-cost urban housing – State-of-the-art review

Zami, MS and Lee, A 2010, 'Economic benefits of contemporary earth construction in low-cost urban housing – State-of-the-art review' , Journal of Building Appraisal, 5 (3) , pp. 259-271.

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Abstract

T Most cities and towns in developing countries are experiencing a massive infl ux of population from rural areas. The majority of the rural population migrates to urban areas hoping to fi nd a job and a higher income for their survival. This large infl ux creates a high demand for urban housing and infrastructure, which the majority of the migrants cannot afford. Moreover, the insuffi cient use of low-cost traditional building materials and construction techniques in residential construction has resulted in expensive housing stock for the majority of the poor. There is therefore an urgent need to assess alternative building materials and techniques that are both affordable and sustainable. Stabilised earth is an alternative building material that is signifi cantly cheaper than using conventional brick and concrete, and is also environmentally sustainable. Earth has been used as a construction material on every continent and in every age. This article reviews and argues the economic benefi ts of using earth as a building material, and describes the associated construction techniques for urban housing provision in developing countries. A critical literature review method was adopted in this article to investigate the economic benefi t of contemporary earth construction in low-cost urban housing compared to conventional brick and concrete construction.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of the Built Environment
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Building Appraisal
Publisher: Macmillan Publishers Ltd
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1742-8262
Related URLs:
Funders: Funder not known
Depositing User: Institutional Repository
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2014 12:57
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2016 18:17
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/32500

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