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Development and biomechanical evaluation of a prefabricated anti pronation foot orthosis

Majumdar, R, Laxton, P, Thuesen, AH, Richards, B, Liu, A, Aran-Ais, F, Montiel-Parreno, E and Nester, CJ 2013, 'Development and biomechanical evaluation of a prefabricated anti pronation foot orthosis' , Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 50 (10) , pp. 1332-1342.

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Abstract

Our aim was to develop and evaluate a new antipronation foot orthosis that addressed problems perceived by clinicians and users with existing foot orthoses. Clinicians and users were engaged to develop a user specification for the orthosis, and orthotic geometry and materials were developed using clinical reasoning. The orthotic material properties were tested and the ability of the orthosis to reduce foot pronation evaluated on 27 individuals. Clinicians expressed concern that current prefabricated orthoses often did not offer sufficient support to the foot because of a combination of the shape and materials used, and users concurred but also highlighted issues of durability and hygiene. The geometry of the new orthosis was, therefore, adjusted to enable individual foot size orthoses to be produced. A material was selected that was harder and more durable than materials used in many prefabricated orthoses. When the new orthosis was being worn, maximum rearfoot eversion was reduced in both walking (mean reduction 3.8 degrees, p < 0.001) and running (mean reduction 2.5 degrees, p < 0.001). Through a structured process, orthotic design decisions were made that addressed the specific concerns of clinicians and users and the new orthosis was proven to reduce rearfoot pronation.

Item Type: Article
Themes: Health and Wellbeing
Schools: Schools > School of Health Sciences > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Publisher: Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, Department of Veterans Affairs
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0748-7711
Related URLs:
Funders: UK Technology Strategy Board Knowledge Transfer Partnership
Depositing User: Professor Christopher Nester
Date Deposited: 14 Oct 2014 16:37
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2014 16:37
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/32911

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