Skip to the content

Employee cynicism - the role of dispositional envy and gossip engagement

Chang, K, Kuo, KC, Kuo, TK and Quinton, S 2015, Employee cynicism - the role of dispositional envy and gossip engagement , in: 17th Congress of European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology, 20- 23rd May 2015, Oslo, Norway. (In Press)

[img] PDF
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (16kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Purpose: Employee cynicism is characterised by frustration, disillusionment, as well as contempt toward managers. Inspired by self-evaluation-maintenance theory (Tesser, 1988), this research examined the relationship between employee cynicism and two specific factors: dispositional envy and gossip engagement, with an aim to further understand the influence of cynicism at the level of the individual employee and, to suggest approaches to alleviate its impact on organisations. Design/Methodology: Data were collected from 248 full-time employees using surveys, via a 3-wave collection procedure which ameliorated the CMV bias. Findings: Positive-gossip engagement correlated with less cynicism, and that negative-gossip engagement correlated with more cynicism. Dispositional envy was correlated with engagement in both positive- and negative- gossip. The findings also highlighted a mediating effect, that dispositional envy not only increased cynicism via negative-gossip engagement, but also decreased such cynicism via positive-gossip engagement. Limitations: In this study only two factors, dispositional envy and gossip engagement, were examined. Research/Practical Implications: Managers should recognise and monitor changes in employee dispositional envy and gossip engagement, so that responses through management actions can be made promptly to minimise any potential disruption arising from employee cynicism. Originality/Value: This research differs from previous studies, as it focuses on the individual and the factors relating to cynicism at work rather than on management strategies. New insight has been provided into gossip engagement and its relationship to cynicism. Specifically, employees who engage in negative gossip are likely to demonstrate cynicism, whereas employees who engage in positive gossip are not likely to exhibit cynicism.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Themes: Built and Human Environment
Health and Wellbeing
Schools: Schools > Salford Business School
Journal or Publication Title: 17th Congress of European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology
Publisher: European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology
Refereed: Yes
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: Professor Kirk Chang
Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2015 11:29
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2016 18:18
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/33280

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year