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Fish oil supplementation, resting blood flow and markers of cellular metabolism during incremental exercise

Pearson, SJ, Johnson, T and Robins, A 2014, 'Fish oil supplementation, resting blood flow and markers of cellular metabolism during incremental exercise' , International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research, 84 (1-2) , pp. 18-26.

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Abstract

Dietary supplementation of fish oils (n-3 PUFA) have been observed to affect insulin action and hence metabolism, affecting the ability to carry out work. Here we examine the effects of fish oil supplementation in conjunction with a glucose load during exertion, on markers of substrate utilization. A pre-test, post-test design was performed on ten healthy young males to assess the effects of 4 weeks fish oil supplementation on muscle metabolism during incremental exertion. Breath-by-breath analysis for respiratory exchange ratio (RER) along with blood lactate and blood glucose were determined at baseline, during exercise following an acute glucose bolus (10% solution at 4 mL/kg/bw), and again following supplementation of 4.2 g.day(-1) (2.2 g EPA, 1.4 g DHA). To examine the effect of fish oil on blood flow, Doppler ultrasound was used to assess femoral blood flow at rest. Following consumption of fish oils, exercising blood glucose and RER were seen to change significantly (4.66±0.44 vs. 4.58±0.31 mmol.L(-1) and 0.97±0.03 vs. 0.99±0.04; p<0.05). Resting femoral arterial blood flow was seen to increase significantly (p<0.05) pre- to post- test; 0.26±0.02-0.30±0.03 L.min(-1). Specific population groups such as those undertaking high-intensity exercise, and clinical groups such as intermittent claudicants, may benefit from the effects of fish oil supplementation.

Item Type: Article
Themes: Health and Wellbeing
Schools: Schools > School of Health Sciences > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research
Publisher: Huber
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0300-9831
Related URLs:
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: S Pearson
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2015 12:30
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2015 08:16
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/35047

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