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Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in localized populations of Apodemus sylvaticus is linked to population genotype not to population location

Bajnok, J, Boyce, K, Rogan, MT, Craig, PS, Lun, ZR and Hide, G 2015, 'Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in localized populations of Apodemus sylvaticus is linked to population genotype not to population location' , Parasitology, 142 (5) , pp. 680-690.

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Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii is a globally distributed parasite infecting humans and warm-blooded animals. Although many surveys have been conducted for T. gondii infection in mammals, little is known about the detailed distribution in localized natural populations. In this study, host genotype and spatial location were investigated in relation to T. gondii infection. Wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) were collected from 4 sampling sites within a localized peri-aquatic woodland ecosystem. Mice were genotyped using standard A. sylvaticus microsatellite markers and T. gondii was detected using 4 specific PCR-based markers: SAG1, SAG2, SAG3 and GRA6 directly from infected tissue. Of 126 wood mice collected, 44 samples were positive giving an infection rate of 34.92% (95% CI: 27.14-43.59%). Juvenile, young adults and adults were infected at a similar prevalence, respectively, 7/17 (41.18%), 27/65 (41.54%) and 10/44 (22.72%) with no significant age-prevalence effect (P = 0.23). Results of genetic analysis of the mice showed that the collection consists of 4 genetically distinct populations. There was a significant difference in T. gondii prevalence in the different genotypically derived mouse populations (P = 0.035) but not between geographically defined populations (P = 0.29). These data point to either a host genetic/family influence on parasite infection or to parasite vertical transmission.

Item Type: Article
Themes: Health and Wellbeing
Subjects outside of the University Themes
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Biomedical Research Centre
Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Parasitology
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0031-1820
Related URLs:
Funders: University of Salford, British Society of Parasitology
Depositing User: Professor Geoff Hide
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2015 14:46
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2016 19:29
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/35271

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