Music practice within The Salvation Army : its history, significance and relevance in the 21st Century

Blyth, AJ 2015, Music practice within The Salvation Army : its history, significance and relevance in the 21st Century , MPhil thesis, Salford University.

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Abstract

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church. Since its inception in 1878 the movement has placed music at the heart of its worship. This thesis examines the development of music within The Salvation Army and how the militaristic ideals of the movement were developed from the founder William Booth’s Methodist roots and 19th century Christian Militarism. It also explores how a music programme that included brass bands, choirs and a dedicated music publishing house has become a set model that has remained virtually unchanged since the inception of a Music Department in 1883. These initial implementations were driven not only by William Booth but also by Richard Slater, a musician converted to The Salvation Army and tasked to run and shape the movement’s music policy. I seek to understand how he formed, influenced and led music publishing and how that still affects Salvation Army music policy. The challenge for The Salvation Army in this post-modern society is how these traditional music models can stay relevant without the need to radically change the direction they have previously taken. The challenge is particularly strong as The Salvation Army has declined in number in the United Kingdom since 1914 and has lost many musicians during this time. This thesis investigates how it can attract and keep members with relevant music programmes and publishing that will meet the demands of the 21st century.

Item Type: Thesis (MPhil)
Themes: Media, Digital Technology and the Creative Economy
Schools: Schools > School of Arts & Media > Arts, Media and Communication Research Centre
Funders: School for In-Service Training and Development
Depositing User: AJ Blyth
Date Deposited: 31 May 2017 15:30
Last Modified: 31 May 2017 15:30
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/35652

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