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Mapping potential risk for housing damage from ground movement due to climate change

Zarpelon Leao, S 2014, 'Mapping potential risk for housing damage from ground movement due to climate change' , International Journal of Environment and Sustainable Development (IJESD), 5 (4) , pp. 387-392.

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Abstract

The performance of footings in residential construction is influenced by the degree of ground movement, particularly in reactive soils, which is driven by the magnitude of change in soil moisture. New patterns of climate are affecting residential foundations and causing serious and expensive damage. This paper produces a map of potential risk for housing damage from ground movement due to climate change. Using a geographic information system, it combines information on (1) soil moisture change related to climate, using TMI as the indicator, and (2) population growth. Preliminary results, having Victoria, Australia, in the last decade as the case study, suggest that effects of climate change on soil, and resulting impacts on house foundations, are not being taken into consideration in current planning strategies for urban development. Most of the urban growth priority zones in the study area are susceptible to medium and high risk for damage. Producing new and renovated buildings that are durable in the long term is essential for the economy, environment and social welfare. The map presented here can assist policies and strategies towards urban resilience in the context of climate change.

Item Type: Article
Themes: Built and Human Environment
Schools: Schools > School of the Built Environment
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal of Environment and Sustainable Development (IJESD)
Publisher: Inderscience
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1474-6778
Related URLs:
Funders: School of Architecture and Built Environment of Deakin University
Depositing User: S Zarpelon Leao
Date Deposited: 31 Jul 2015 17:11
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2016 19:31
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/35900

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