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An evaluation of post-registration neuroscience focused education and neuroscience nurses' perceived educational needs

Braine, ME and Cook, NF 2015, 'An evaluation of post-registration neuroscience focused education and neuroscience nurses' perceived educational needs' , Nurse Education Today, 35 (11) , pp. 1069-1074.

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Abstract

Background People with complex neurological conditions require co-ordinated care provided by nurses educated in meeting service needs, understanding the pathophysiological processes of disease and the preparation to care for those with complex needs. However, evidence suggests that neuroscience specific education provision is largely unregulated and set outside of a cohesive professional development context. Furthermore, it largely seems to only address the induction phase into working within neurosciences. Objectives To evaluate the nature of post-registration neuroscience focused education across Europe and neuroscience nurses' perceived educational needs. Methods Post qualifying nurses working in the field of neurosciences were invited to complete a self-reported 29-item on-line questionnaire that contained closed and open-ended questions exploring professional background, clinical and educational experience, educational opportunities available to them and their perspectives on their educational needs. Results 154 participants from fourteen countries across Europe completed the survey. 75% (n = 110) of respondents had undertaken neuroscience focused education with the most accessible education opportunities found to be conferences 77% (n = 96) and study days 69% (n = 86). Overall, 52.6% of courses were multidisciplinary in nature, and 47.4% were exclusively nursing. Most identified that their courses were funded by their employer (57%, n = 63) or partly funded by their employer. Results illustrate a significant variance across Europe, highlighting the need for more effective communication between neuroscience nurses across Europe. Implications for future education provision, recruitment/retention, and funding are discussed, resulting in recommendations for the future of neuroscience nursing. Conclusions This study, the largest of its kind to survey neuroscience nurses, illustrates the absence of a cohesive career development pathway for neuroscience nurses in Europe. Nurses need quality assured specialist education to deliver high quality appropriate healthcare.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Nurse Education Today
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0260-6917
Related URLs:
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: Dr Mary E. Braine
Date Deposited: 24 May 2016 13:27
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 12:32
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/36165

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