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Effects of visible implanted elastomer marking on physiological traits of frogs

Antwis, RE, Purcell, R, Walker, SL, Fidgett, AL and Preziosi, RF 2014, 'Effects of visible implanted elastomer marking on physiological traits of frogs' , Conservation Physiology, 2 (1) , cou042-cou042.

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Abstract

Amphibians possess innate immune defences, including antimicrobial peptides and symbiotic bacterial communities, that can protect them from infectious diseases, including chytridiomycosis. On-going research is attempting to use amphibian symbiotic bacteria to develop probiotic treatments that can protect hosts from the causative agent of chytridiomycosis, the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Events that cause disruption of symbiotic bacterial communities or deplete peptide stores could increase the susceptibility of individuals to disease and may have implications for amphibians involved in probiotic trials or time course studies that investigate symbiotic bacterial communities. It has previously been shown that passive integrated transponder tagging of frogs causes a rapid (within 24 h) and major proliferation of micro-organisms on the skin. Here, we show that marking of red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas) with visible elastomer has no effect on adrenal response (represented by faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations) or peptide production, although there was evidence of a slightly greater microbial abundance associated with the skin of marked frogs 2 weeks after tagging. The results indicate that visible elastomer may be a preferable marking technique to passive integrated transponder tagging, particularly in the context of probiotic trials or time course studies that investigate symbiotic bacterial communities. More work is required to determine the effects of different marking techniques on physiological responses of amphibians, whether these physiological responses are consistent across host species and whether such ‘non-invasive’ marking methods affect the susceptibility of amphibians to infectious pathogens, such as B. dendrobatidis.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Amphibian, Glucocorticoid, Marking technique, Peptide, Symbiotic bacteria
Themes: Subjects outside of the University Themes
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Conservation Physiology
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 2051-1434
Funders: Biotechnology and Biosciences Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
Depositing User: Dr Rachael Antwis
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2015 08:54
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2016 19:36
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/36707

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