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Insight into lying behaviour with priming effect : three studies of using French politicians and presidents as primers

Chang, K, Celse, J and Quinton, S 2015, Insight into lying behaviour with priming effect : three studies of using French politicians and presidents as primers , in: The 31st International Congress of Psychology, 24-29 July 2016, Yokohama, Tokyo, Japan.

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Official URL: http://www.icp2016.jp/

Abstract

Priming is a non-conscious memory effect, in which exposure to one stimulus affects the response to another. Following priming theories, we propose an innovative view that people who perceived politicians as being dishonest (lying) are likely to lie themselves. To examine this view, three scenario-based studies (N = 218) were conducted; primers included the clergy, named French Presidents and political parties. Study 1 demonstrated that participants with clergy priming were less likely to lie (compared to politician priming). Study 2 indicated that participants with Sarkozy priming were more likely to lie (compared to Hollande priming). Study 3 found that Sarkozy priming effect may originate from his political party rather Sarkozy himself.These findings suggest that lying can be triggered by external influencers such as government leaders and politicians and this provides an alternative perspective to the current view of lying as interest-driven or self-protection behaviour, implications follow.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Speech)
Schools: Schools > Salford Business School > Business and Management Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Diversity in Harmony : Insights from Psychology
Publisher: The 31st International Congress of Psychology
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: Professor Kirk Chang
Date Deposited: 26 Oct 2015 11:49
Last Modified: 29 Oct 2015 00:50
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/36894

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