Students academic expectations and experience during the first year of their undergraduate nursing programme

Grant, Janice M 2012, Students academic expectations and experience during the first year of their undergraduate nursing programme , PhD thesis, University of Salford.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Related to student expectation, experience and retention) - Accepted Version
Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Abstract The thesis examines why first year nursing students leave their programme of study and the factors that influence whether they stay or leave. A descriptive, exploratory study design was undertaken using two survey instruments, the College Students Expectations Questionnaire and the College Student Experiences Questionnaire. Data about the expectations and experiences of one cohort of nursing students were collected at the beginning and compared with experiences the end of their first year of study. Additional data obtained from institutional records. There was a preponderance of first generation university students who entered the university through completion of an Access to Health Studies course. This group entertained similar high expectations of academic achievement to the school leavers. These expectations were not that was not matched by their experiences in the main. The most successful students being those in the 30 to 39 age group. Overall, students’ degree classifications did not match their expected performance. The findings show that most students who left the programme intended to return but did not do so. Identifying predictors of success for nursing students remains a key issue for the nursing profession. The findings indicate that although student attrition is multi-factorial, focussing on the predictors of success can overshadow the need to identify and support students who possess the potential for success if additional support is provided. The findings also underline the importance of helping students connect with their learning environment during the first year and to develop self efficacy skills early.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Schools: Schools > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: JM Grant
Date Deposited: 05 Jun 2017 12:08
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2017 12:08
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/37465

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year