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Windows Instant Messaging App Forensics : Facebook and Skype as case studies

Yang, TY, Dehghantanha, A, Choo, KR and Muda, Z 2016, 'Windows Instant Messaging App Forensics : Facebook and Skype as case studies' , PLoS ONE, 11 (3) , e0150300.

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Abstract

Instant messaging has changed the way people communicate with each other. However, the interactive and instant nature of these messaging applications made them an attractive choice for malicious cyber activities such as phishing. Forensic study of the instant messaging applications for modern Windows 8.1 has been largely unexplored, as the platform is relatively new. In this paper, we seek to determine the data remnants from the use of two popular Windows Store application software for instant messaging, namely Facebook and Skype on a Windows 8.1 client machine. This research contributes to an in-depth understanding of the types of terrestrial artefacts that are likely to remain after the use of instant messaging services and application software on a contemporary Windows operating system. Potential artefacts detected during the research include data relating to the installation or uninstallation of the instant messaging application software, log-in and log-off information, contact lists, conversations, and transferred files.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Computing, Science and Engineering > Salford Innovation Research Centre (SIRC)
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Publisher: Public Library of Science
ISSN: 1932-6203
Related URLs:
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: WM Taylor
Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2016 11:41
Last Modified: 18 Apr 2016 09:00
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/37999

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