Skip to the content

Role of vertical transmission of Toxoplasma gondii in prevalence of infection.

Hide, G 2016, 'Role of vertical transmission of Toxoplasma gondii in prevalence of infection.' , Expert review of anti-infective therapy, 14 (3) , pp. 335-44.

[img] Microsoft Word - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 17 February 2017.

Download (86kB) | Request a copy
[img] Microsoft Word (Submitted Figure 1) - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 17 February 2017.

Download (30kB) | Request a copy
[img] Microsoft Word (Submitted Figure 2) - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 17 February 2017.

Download (47kB) | Request a copy
[img] Microsoft Word (Submitted Figure 3) - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 17 February 2017.

Download (52kB) | Request a copy
[img] Microsoft Word (Submitted Table 1) - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 17 February 2017.

Download (14kB) | Request a copy
[img] Microsoft Word (Submitted Table 2) - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 17 February 2017.

Download (14kB) | Request a copy
[img] Microsoft Word (Submitted Table 3) - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 17 February 2017.

Download (16kB) | Request a copy
[img] PDF (Publishers Published version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

Abstract

The parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, is a highly successful pathogen that infects around 30% of the global human population. Additionally, it is able to infect all warm blooded animals with high prevalence. This is surprising as it is a parasite of the cat and can only complete its full sexual cycle in that host. This review examines the important key routes of transmission: infective oocysts from the cat, ingestion of raw infected tissue and vertical transmission. The latter route of transmission has traditionally been thought to be rare. In this review, this assumption is examined and discussed in the light of the current literature. The available evidence points to the possibility that vertical transmission occurs frequently in natural populations of mice however the evidence in sheep is currently ambivalent and controversial. In humans, the situation appears as though vertical transmission may be rare although there is still much that is unexplained.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Biomedical Research Centre
Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Expert review of anti-infective therapy
Publisher: Expert Reviews
ISSN: 1744-8336
Related URLs:
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: Professor Geoff Hide
Date Deposited: 22 Mar 2016 15:12
Last Modified: 06 Apr 2016 09:04
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/38234

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year