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Monitoring and assessment of treated river, rain, gully pot and grey waters for irrigation of Capsicum annuum

Al-Isawi, R, Almuktar, S and Scholz, M 2016, 'Monitoring and assessment of treated river, rain, gully pot and grey waters for irrigation of Capsicum annuum' , Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 188 (5) .

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Abstract

This study examines the benefits and risks associated with various types of wastewater recycled for vegetable garden irrigation and proposes the best water source in terms of its water quality impact on crop yields. The aim was to evaluate the usability of river, rain, gully pot, real grey and artificial grey waters to water crops. The objectives were to evaluate variables and boundary conditions influencing the growth of chillies (De Cayenne; Capsicum annuum (Linnaeus) Longum Group 'De Cayenne') both in the laboratory and in the greenhouse. A few irrigated chilli plants suffered from excess of some nutrients, which led to a relatively poor harvest. High levels of trace minerals and heavy metals were detected in river water, gully pot effluent and greywater. However, no significant differences in plant yields were observed, if compared with standards and other yields worldwide. The highest yields were associated with river water both in the laboratory and in the greenhouse. Plant productivity was unaffected by water quality due to the high manganese, potassium, cadmium and copper levels of the greywater. These results indicate the potential of river water and gully pot effluent as viable alternatives to potable water for irrigation in agriculture.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Computing, Science and Engineering > Salford Innovation Research Centre (SIRC)
Journal or Publication Title: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Publisher: Springer
ISSN: 0167-6369
Related URLs:
Funders: Government of Iraq
Depositing User: M Scholz
Date Deposited: 29 Apr 2016 14:18
Last Modified: 27 Jun 2016 10:23
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/38823

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