Skip to the content

‘Being kinder to myself ’: a prospective comparative study, exploring post-trauma therapy outcome measures, for two groups of clients, receiving either Cognitive Behaviour Therapy or Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Compassionate Mind Training

Beaumont, EA, Jenkins, P and Galpin, AJ 2012, '‘Being kinder to myself ’: a prospective comparative study, exploring post-trauma therapy outcome measures, for two groups of clients, receiving either Cognitive Behaviour Therapy or Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Compassionate Mind Training' , Counselling Psychology Review, 27 (1) , pp. 31-43.

[img] PDF - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (231kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Background/Aims/Objectives: This prospective, comparative outcome study was designed to contrast the relative impact of differing therapeutic interventions for trauma victims, carried out by the same therapist. Methods/Methodology: A non-random convenience sample (N=32) of participants, referred for therapy following a traumatic incident, were randomly assigned to receive up to 12 sessions of either Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), or CBT coupled with Compassionate Mind Training (CMT). A repeated measures design was used and data was analysed using analysis of variance. Data was gathered pre-therapy and post-therapy, using three self-report questionnaires (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; Impact of Events Scale; the Self-Compassion Scale). Results/Findings: Results supported two of the three original hypotheses. Participants in both conditions experienced a highly statistically significant reduction in symptoms of anxiety, depression, avoidant behaviour, intrusive thoughts and hyper-arousal symptoms post-therapy. Participants in the combined CBT and CMT condition developed statistically significant higher self-compassion scores post-therapy than the CBT-only group [F(1,30)=4.657, p≤.05]. There was no significant difference between treatment groups. Discussion/Conclusions: The results suggest that CMT may be a useful addition to CBT for clients suffering with trauma-related symptoms. In conclusion, high levels of self-compassion are linked to a decrease in anxiety and depression and trauma-related symptoms. Keywords: trauma; cognitive behaviour therapy; compassionate mind training; counselling psychology.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences > Centre for Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Counselling Psychology Review
Publisher: The British Psychological Society
ISSN: 0269-6975
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: EA Beaumont
Date Deposited: 20 Jun 2016 09:40
Last Modified: 05 Jul 2016 08:36
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/39206

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year