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The effect of dual tasking on foot biomechanics in people with functional ankle instability

Tavakoli, S, Forghany, S and Nester, CJ 2016, 'The effect of dual tasking on foot biomechanics in people with functional ankle instability' , Gait & Posture, 49 , pp. 364-370.

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Abstract

Background: Some cases of repeated inversion ankle sprains are thought to have a neurological basis and are termed functional ankle instability (FAI). In addition to factors local to the ankle, such as loss of proprioception, cognitive demands have the ability to influence motor control and may increase the risk of repetitive lateral sprains. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive demand on foot kinematics in physically active people with functional ankle instability. Methods: 21 physically active participants with FAI and 19 matched healthy controls completed trials of normal walking (single task) and normal walking while performing a cognitive task (dual task). Foot motion relative to the shank was recorded. Cognitive performance, ankle kinematics and movement variability in single and dual task conditions was characterized. Results: During normal walking, the ankle joint was significantly more inverted in FAI compared to the control group pre and post initial contact. Under dual task conditions, there was a statistically significant increase in frontal plane foot movement variability during the period 200ms pre and post initial contact in people with FAI compared to the control group (p<0.05). Dual task also significantly increased plantar flexion and inversion during the period 200ms pre and post initial contact in the FAI group (p<0.05). Conclusion: participants with FAI demonstrated different ankle movement patterns and increased movement variability during a dual task condition. Cognitive load may increase risk of ankle instability in these people.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Gait & Posture
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0966-6362
Related URLs:
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: Professor Christopher Nester
Date Deposited: 05 Aug 2016 10:05
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2016 09:54
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/39664

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