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Evaluating the relative influence on population health of domestic gardens and green space along a rural-urban gradient

Dennis, M and James, P 2016, 'Evaluating the relative influence on population health of domestic gardens and green space along a rural-urban gradient' , Landscape and Urban Planning . (In Press)

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Studies have repeatedly affirmed the positive links between human and environmental health but few have sufficiently addressed the complexity brought about by the range of urbanity, population and both green space and domestic gardens cover associated human settlements. With the global population increasingly residing in cities, the relevance of urbanisation, local population and discrete types of green space provision on measures of health, remains a research imperative. To explore this complexity, a series of regression models were employed to quantify the mitigation of local health deprivation by green space and domestic gardens, across a four-stage rural-urban gradient, controlling for household income and local population. The population-standardised quantification of green space provision offered greater interpretive power than did a simple measure of land cover density. Domestic gardens, of the two green land-cover types, provided the most convincing mitigating effect on health deprivation. The findings call for increased acknowledgement of urban gardens in local health promotion, and a closer consideration of local population in planning green space provision and management.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Landscape and Urban Planning
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0169-2046
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: Dr Matthew Dennis
Date Deposited: 01 Sep 2016 07:47
Last Modified: 05 Sep 2016 07:50

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