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A pilot study exploring the relationship between self-compassion, self-judgement, self-kindness, compassion, professional quality of life and wellbeing among UK community nurses

Durkin, M, Beaumont, EA, Hollins Martin, CJ and Carson, J 2016, 'A pilot study exploring the relationship between self-compassion, self-judgement, self-kindness, compassion, professional quality of life and wellbeing among UK community nurses' , Nurse Education Today, 46 , pp. 109-114.

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Abstract

Background: Compassion fatigue and burnout can impact on performance of nurses. This paper explores the relationship between self-compassion, self-judgement, self-kindness, compassion, professional quality of life, and wellbeing among community nurses. Aim: To measure associations between self-compassion, compassion fatigue, wellbeing, and burnout in community nurses. Method: Quantitative data were collected using standardised psychometric questionnaires: (1) Professional Quality of Life Scale; (2) Self-Compassion Scale; (3) short Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale; (4) Compassion For Others Scale, used to measure relationships between self-compassion, compassion fatigue, wellbeing, and burnout. Participants: A cross sectional sample of registered community nurses (n=37) studying for a postgraduate diploma at a University in the North of England took part in this study. Results: Results show that community nurses who score high on measures of self-compassion and wellbeing, also report less burnout. Greater compassion satisfaction was also positively associated with compassion for others, and wellbeing, whilst also being negatively correlated with burnout. Conclusion: High levels of self-compassion were linked with lower levels of burnout. Furthermore when community nurses have greater compassion satisfaction they also report more compassion for others, increased wellbeing, and less burnout. The implications of this are discussed alongside suggestions for the promotion of greater compassion. Key words: burnout, compassion fatigue, district nurses, compassion, self-compassion, wellbeing

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Nurse Education Today
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0260-6917
Related URLs:
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: EA Beaumont
Date Deposited: 06 Sep 2016 13:25
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2016 10:41
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/40040

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