Lens or prism? How organisations sustain multiple and competing reputations

Harvey, WS, Tourky, M, Knight, E and Kitchen, PJ 2016, 'Lens or prism? How organisations sustain multiple and competing reputations' , European Journal of Marketing, 51 (4) , pp. 821-844.

[img] PDF - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 11 November 2018.

Download (482kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Purpose: This paper challenges singular definitions, measurements and applications of corporate reputation which tend to be reductionist. We rebuff such narrow representations of reputation by showing the multiplicity of reputation in the case of a global management consulting firm and demonstrate how it has sustained such reputations. Design/methodology/approach: Using a large cross-country qualitative case study based on interviews, focus groups, non-participant observations, workshops and a fieldwork diary, dimensions of reputation are highlighted by drawing on perceptions from multiple stakeholder groups in different geographies. Findings: We find significant differences in perceptions of reputation between and within stakeholder groups, with perceptions changing across dimensions and geographies. Originality/value: The theoretical implications of the research indicate a plurality of extant reputations, suggesting that a prism is more suited to representing corporate reputation than a singular lens-like focus which is too narrow to constitute reputation. This paper offers theoretical and practical suggestions for how global firms can build and sustain multiple and competing corporate reputations.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > Salford Business School
Journal or Publication Title: European Journal of Marketing
Publisher: Emerald
ISSN: 0309-0566
Related URLs:
Depositing User: WM Taylor
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2016 10:38
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2017 00:12
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/40777

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year