De-mystifying role transition : a study to evaluate the preparation for role transition : perspectives from final year undergraduate nursing students and stakeholders

Leigh, JA and Darvil, A 2016, De-mystifying role transition : a study to evaluate the preparation for role transition : perspectives from final year undergraduate nursing students and stakeholders , in: Networking for Education in Healthcare Conference, 6-8 September 2016, Cambridge. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: The experiences of transition of graduated nurses entering the world of work are of fundamental concern to those seeking to prepare, recruit and retain such nurses (Darvill, Fallon & Livesley 2014). Graduate nurse transition continues to remain a difficult time for many new graduate nurses internationally, with significant numbers of graduates being dissatisfied, ultimately considering leaving or exiting the profession (Philips, Estermann & Kenny 2015). New graduates engaging in a professional practice role are confronted with a broad range of emotional, physical, intellectual, developmental and socio-cultural changes that are experienced as reality or transition shock (Kramer 1974, Boychuk Duchscher 2007). The context for this study is a final year semester one module “Preparation for role transition” which aims to prepare undergraduate nursing students for transition and to ameliorate some of the effects of the findings in the literature as suggested by Darvill (2013). This study explores how students prepare for transition through self assessment and personal development planning of their knowledge, skills and values necessary for a smooth transition. Students will also be utilising an evidence based 3rd year checklist (Leigh et al. 2014a, Leigh et al. 2014b) in support allocating the student to their final practice placement. This is a longitudinal study progressing through the final two semesters of the undergraduate nursing programme; and working in their first staff nurse role. This paper will present the findings of the initial stages of the study. Aim(s): 1. To critically evaluate preparation for transition from the perspectives of key stakeholders 2. To identify the structures, processes and outcomes that impact on the student’s readiness for transition Research methodology: The theoretical framework for this study is Kirkpatrick’s levels of evaluation model (Kirkpatrick 1983, Winfrey 1999). The study design to realise the levels of Kirkpatrick's Model will capture the intended and unintended effects (impacts) of the participants. Sample Purposive sample of • Students attending the Preparation for Role Transition Module with mark of 85 and above (n=15) • Student’s mentor on the final placement (n=15), Data Collection: Documents and the semi structured interview will be utilized to critically explore transition. Data Analysis: Thematic content analysis will be applied to the interviews conducted and documents retrieved, and this will ensure that the analysis is rigorous and that links are being made between the empirical data and the claims made by the researcher (Green and Thorogood 2004). Ethical approval gained from the University of Salford. Key findings and recommendations: The initial findings clearly demonstrate the positive impact that preparation for transition has had on student’s learning and development. The process of self-assessment and personal development planning (PDP) has increased their self awareness and confidence levels. They have been able to highlight areas for development during and their final year and these areas will be discussed. Support has been a theme identified by the students and the perspectives of their final placement mentors will also be explored. The findings clearly demonstrate synergy between transition, leadership, personal resilience, student self- motivation, assertiveness and role modelling. These are the personal qualities required for effective transition. Recommendations so far include: • Self assessment and personal planning should be embedded at the start of the final year of nursing programmes. • Create the right conditions for students to demonstrate personal qualities of effective transition • The support of the mentor is crucial to the development of transition focused PDP’s • Education of mentors regarding transition focused PDP’s References: Boychuk Duchscher, J. (2007). Professional role transition into acute-care by newly qualified graduated baccalaureate female registered nurses. Unpublished PhD thesis. University of Alberta, Canada. Darvill, A. (2013). A qualitative study into the experiences of newly qualified children’s nurses during their transition into children’s community nursing teams. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Salford, UK. Darvill, A., Fallon, D., & Livesley, J. (2014). A different world? The transition experiences of newly qualified children’s nurses taking up first destination posts within children’s community nursing teams. Issues in Comprehensive Paediatric Nursing. 37, (1). 6-24. Kramer, M. (1974). Reality shock: why nurses leave nursing, St Louis, Mosby. Leigh J A., Bell A., Bulpitt S., Dean S., Drury S., Finnigan N., Fishburn N., Hill P., O'Flanagan S., Savin C., Winder H., Withnell N., (2014a)Innovative Placement Allocation Model for Pre-Registration Student Nurses, Nursing Times, 17.09.14 / Vol 110 No 38 Leigh J A., Bell A., Bulpitt S., Dean S., Drury S., Finnigan N., Fishburn N., Hill P., O'Flanagan S., Savin C., Winder H., Withnell N., (2014b)Innovative Placement Allocation Model for Pre-Registration Student Nurses, eWIN Workforce Information Network Portal https://www.ewin.nhs.uk/resources/item/3726/innovative-placement-allocation-model-for-pre-registration-student-nurses (Accessed January 2016) Phillips, C. , Esterman, A. & Kenny, A. (2015) Nurse The theory of organisational socialisation and its potential for improving transition experiences for new graduate nurses. Nurse Education Today 35 , (3). 118–124 Keywords: 1. Best practice principles for transition 2. Model for role transition 3. Pedagogical approaches 3 key points to indicate how your work contributes to knowledge development within the selected theme 1. Embedding the best practice principles for role transition within a role transition model 2. Recommendations for undergraduate curriculum development planners in terms of role transition 3. The best platform for transition is to create a dynamic and flexible curriculum that takes place in both the empowered healthcare and academic setting

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Schools: Schools > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences > Centre for Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences Research
Funders: University of Salford
Depositing User: JA Leigh
Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2016 09:44
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2017 09:56
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/40794

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