Health behavioural theories and their application to women’s participation in mammography screening : a narrative review

Lawal, O, Murphy, FJ, Hogg, P and Nightingale, JM 2017, 'Health behavioural theories and their application to women’s participation in mammography screening : a narrative review' , Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences .

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Abstract

The most effective method of detecting breast cancer amongst asymptomatic women is by mammography screening. Although, most countries have this preventive measure in place for women within their society; most of these programmes still struggle with women’s attendance. This article discusses four health behavioural theories and models, in relation to mammography screening, including the health belief model, theory of planned behaviour, trans-theoretical model, and the theory of care seeking behaviour that may explain the factors affecting women's participation in mammography screening. In summary, analysis of these theories indicates that the theory of care seeking behaviour has value for exploring the factors affecting women's participation in mammography screening. This is because of its sensitivity to socioeconomic differences that exists amongst women in the society, and that it has a broader construct (such as habit and external factors) compared to the other health behavioural theories.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1939-8654
Related URLs:
Funders: Non funded research
Depositing User: P Hogg
Date Deposited: 04 Jan 2017 08:50
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2017 06:14
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/41121

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