Investigating market demand and supply of construction industry waste as a lucrative outlet for integrating informal sector recycling/scavenging in Port Harcourt metropolis

Amadi, AI and Higham, AP 2016, 'Investigating market demand and supply of construction industry waste as a lucrative outlet for integrating informal sector recycling/scavenging in Port Harcourt metropolis' , in: International Sustainable Ecological Engineering Design for Society (SEEDS) Conference 2016 : Conference Proceedings , LSIPublishing, pp. 36-50.

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Abstract

The concept of waste minimization by reclamation and recycling is not new. However, it requires thorough integration into the waste management practices of the construction industry in the fast paced and expanding urban setting of Port Harcourt metropolis. The study investigates waste generation on construction and demolition sites in Port Harcourt, their market demand and recyclable potential, as a viable source of income for the informal sector, integral to establishing an inclusive waste management system. Primary data was obtained through the administration of structured questionnaires to construction companies and private developers, interviews with buyers of recyclables, and site visits. The literature and fieldwork reveals that there is a market demand in Port Harcourt for recycled construction waste such as for filling of pot holes on roads, aluminium sheets for smelting into low-grade cooking utensils, oxygenated wood to produce charcoal and firewood for road side sales of roasted food and construction of temporary wooden structures (Bacha) for low income earners. The response pattern also reveals that wastes are generated mostly for cement/concrete, broken blocks, timber and metals. This represents a potentially steady stream of sourcing for reclaimable and recyclable by-products, against the backdrop of the high proportion of construction of new buildings. Furthermore, the findings reveal that, there is no systematic medium of removal of construction wastes from their source, which often occur in new developing upper class neighbourhoods, where such wastes are carted away unsorted to open dumps or dumped in drains along roadways to low income neighborhoods where the market demand is. Recognizing the health and safety implications of scavenging at dumpsites, this study proposes the systematic integration of organized scavenging as a lucrative outlet for construction waste utilization in Port Harcourt, specifically targeted at direct sourcing and separation of materials generated on construction sites by certified scavengers.

Item Type: Book Section
Schools: Schools > School of the Built Environment
Journal or Publication Title: International Sustainable Ecological Engineering Design for Society
Publisher: LSIPublishing
ISBN: 9780995569010
Depositing User: AI Amadi
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2017 14:41
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2017 23:01
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/41306

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